STRIDE – Part 3/3

Let’s take an example, where it is possible to implement STRIDE techniques to mitigate the threats. Note: Threats should be displayed as the highest priority. The figure below is an example of a server that is connected to many clients via the insecure network.

Screen Shot 2017-03-06 at 2.51.19 pm

 

Implementing STRIDE technique will help to find and fix the vulnerabilities of the system before they can be exploited by the attacker. Below are some of the vulnerabilities, that might be exploited by the attacker, which might cause threats to the system.

Attack the server STRIDE 1

  • Attacker intercepts the data, where the attacker can Tampering with data and Information disclosure or he/she can Spoofing identity.
    • Chance of occurring: (1 = very high).
    • The damage it causes: (10 = massive).
    • Risk: 10/1 = (10).

 

 

Attack the server STRIDE 2

  • Attacker floods server with bad data (Denial of service).
    • Chance of occurring: (1 = very high).
    • The damage it causes: (7 = high).
    • Risk: 7/1 = (7).

 

 

Attack the server STRIDE 3

  • Attacker accesses the configuration data, where the he/she can Tamper with data, Information disclosure and implement a Denial of service.
    • Chance of occurring: (5 = medium).
    • The damage it causes: (10 = massive).
    • Risk: 10/5 = (2).

 

 

Attack the server STRIDE 4

  • Attacker access persistent data or the audit log, where the he/she can Tamper with data, Information disclosure and implement a Denial of service.
    • Chance of occurring: (4 = medium).
    • The damage it causes: (8 = high).
    • Risk: 8/4 = (2).

 

There are several techniques that can be implemented to the STRIDE to mitigate these above threats such as;

  1. S – Strong authentication; and never store secrets.
  2. T – hashes, digital signatures; and tamer resistant protocols.
  3. R – Digital signature, time stamps; and secure logging.
  4. I – Strong access control mechanisms (ACLs), encryption; and never store secrets.
  5. D – Filtering, throttling; and QoS.
  6. E – Run with least privilege.

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Internet Protocol Security (IPSec)

IPSec is an abbreviation for Internet Protocol Security, which is a set of protocols designed to protect the confidentiality and integrity of data as it flows over the network. These protocols are designed to operate at the Network layer (OSI Model) and process the packets according the predefined settings.

ipsec

Comparing to the other methods of security, IPSec has proven to be more successful technology than the other nowadays. In fact, it has the ability to provide tremendous security as well as the ability to be implemented without major changes to individual computer systems.

In order to protect the information, IPSec provides two mechanisms Authentication Header (AH) and Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP).

  • Authentication Header (AH) – it provides authentication services and provides a way to authenticate the sender.
  • Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) – it provides authentication to the information; along with data encryption.

 

In conclusion, the information associated with each of these services is inserted into the packet, where the Authentication Header provides authentication services to the data; and the Encapsulating Security Payload provides data security.